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Survey shows Canadians want action on climate change

November 28, 2014

Most see B.C.-style carbon tax as part of the solution

VANCOUVER — As Canada's environment minister heads to the United Nations climate change summit this week, a survey on Canadians' views about climate change reveals an overwhelming majority (88 per cent) want Canada to commit to significant new actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

In the survey released today by the Environics Institute for Survey Research in partnership with the David Suzuki Foundation, Canadians express most concern (78 per cent) about what climate change will mean for their children and future generations. Scarcity of water and more frequent droughts; increased extreme weather events like storms and flooding; and disappearance of wildlife are also of concern to a majority of Canadians.

Most see B.C.-style carbon tax as part of the solution

VANCOUVER — As Canada's environment minister heads to the United Nations climate change summit this week, a survey on Canadians' views about climate change reveals an overwhelming majority (88 per cent) want Canada to commit to significant new actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

In the survey released today by the Environics Institute for Survey Research in partnership with the David Suzuki Foundation, Canadians express most concern (78 per cent) about what climate change will mean for their children and future generations. Scarcity of water and more frequent droughts; increased extreme weather events like storms and flooding; and disappearance of wildlife are also of concern to a majority of Canadians.

David Suzuki Foundation supports call for moratorium on mining permits in northern Ontario's Ring of Fire

November 27, 2014

TORONTO — The David Suzuki Foundation has told the Ontario government it supports First Nations' requests for a moratorium on mining exploration permits in the Ring of Fire. The Neskantaga and Nibinamik First Nations have asked the provincial government to enact an immediate moratorium on mining exploration permits in the region — the biodiversity-rich boreal forest and Hudson's Bay Lowlands, more than 500 kilometres north of Thunder Bay.

The David Suzuki Foundation is working with the communities to help strengthen their capacity to engage in present and future policy, planning and land use decision-making processes, based on the shared objective of maintaining healthy landscapes that support traditional ways of life and provision of ecological services.

In September, Neskantaga and Nibinamik were two of nine Matawa communities calling for a moratorium on granting future and pending permits until First Nations and the Ontario government develop a regional protocol to address the issue, as they believe adequate consultations are not taking place.

"We agree that proceeding with development decisions while negotiations are under way is counterproductive," said Rachel Plotkin, Ontario science projects manager at the David Suzuki Foundation. "The David Suzuki Foundation strongly believes that before mineral exploration begins, sufficient investments must be made in the social capital of the affected communities, such as investments in community services, so they can successfully engage in government-to-government decision-making processes."

Neskantaga declared a state of emergency last year in light of alarmingly high rates of suicides and suicide attempts in the remote northern community. A Day of Action for the community, in which the David Suzuki Foundation participated, was held in Toronto this spring as the crisis continued.

The community continues to advance initiatives to heal from the traumas of colonialism, forced relocation and residential schools and to seek a positive path for working with the provincial government.

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For more information, please contact Jode Roberts, 647 456-9752

Ontario takes tough, timely action to reduce harm from neonicotinoid pesticides

November 25, 2014

TORONTO — The Ontario government announced a plan today to protect bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects from the harmful effects of neonicotinoid, or neonic, pesticides. In a discussion paper posted to the Ontario Environmental Bill of Rights (EBR) registry, the government outlined a strategy to reduce the use of neonic-coated seeds in the province by 80 per cent by 2017.

TORONTO — The Ontario government announced a plan today to protect bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects from the harmful effects of neonicotinoid, or neonic, pesticides. In a discussion paper posted to the Ontario Environmental Bill of Rights (EBR) registry, the government outlined a strategy to reduce the use of neonic-coated seeds in the province by 80 per cent by 2017.

Co-operation between Ontario and Quebec on climate change and energy sets example for Canada

November 24, 2014

VANCOUVER— The David Suzuki Foundation released the following statement in response to the agreement reached last Friday between the governments of Ontario and Quebec to work together to fight climate change, improve the sharing of electricity resources and jointly assess the risks from the proposed Energy East pipeline.

"Ontario and Quebec's agreement sets an example for Canada on how we need to come together to solve the greatest challenge of our time," said Ian Bruce, Science and Policy manager for the foundation.

VANCOUVER— The David Suzuki Foundation released the following statement in response to the agreement reached last Friday between the governments of Ontario and Quebec to work together to fight climate change, improve the sharing of electricity resources and jointly assess the risks from the proposed Energy East pipeline.

"Ontario and Quebec's agreement sets an example for Canada on how we need to come together to solve the greatest challenge of our time," said Ian Bruce, Science and Policy manager for the foundation.

Health Canada has 100,000 new reasons to rethink approval of controversial pesticides

November 5, 2014

OTTAWA — More than 100,000 people have told Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) not to register flupyradifurone, Bayer's latest bee-killing pesticide.

Over the past three weeks, Sierra Club Canada Foundation, David Suzuki Foundation and SumOfUs.org spearheaded a campaign to inform the public of the opportunity to submit formal comments to the PMRA.

"We shared the facts about flupyradifurone, and the response has been incredible," said Paul Ferris, of SumOfUs.org. "Over 110,000 sent a clear message to PMRA: Protect the bees."

OTTAWA — More than 100,000 people have told Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) not to register flupyradifurone, Bayer's latest bee-killing pesticide.

Over the past three weeks, Sierra Club Canada Foundation, David Suzuki Foundation and SumOfUs.org spearheaded a campaign to inform the public of the opportunity to submit formal comments to the PMRA.

"We shared the facts about flupyradifurone, and the response has been incredible," said Paul Ferris, of SumOfUs.org. "Over 110,000 sent a clear message to PMRA: Protect the bees."