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Canada must do better than federal target to fight climate change

May 15, 2015

Climate change is the most serious issue threatening our communities and security. It is critically important for developed nations like Canada to take a leading role in cutting emissions and finding solutions.

The target released today by the federal government falls short of what the David Suzuki Foundation thinks is necessary and feasible for Canada. Our research has shown that if the existing best-in-country practices at the provincial level were adopted country-wide, Canada would already be on track to meet its 2020 emission target. Instead, as the Office of the Auditor General of Canada has reported, the lack of a unifying approach by the federal government is one of the main reasons Canada is unlikely to meet its own 2020 emission target (let alone for goals for 2030).

Parts of our country are already doing great things. There is no reason we can't be as ambitious as a nation. Canada can and must do better to shrink carbon pollution and prioritize clean energy.

Ian Bruce, science and policy manager, David Suzuki Foundation

David Suzuki to visit B.C. communities

May 13, 2015

Celebrating Coastal Connections tour begins in June

Celebrating Coastal Connections tour begins in June

New NatureWatch features make citizen science easier than ever

May 1, 2015

Spring call goes out to Canadians to record nature in their own backyards

Spring is here and with it NatureWatch and the Toronto Zoo are encouraging Canadians to get into their backyards and local parks and contribute to scientific research at the same time. NatureWatch.ca is launching an enhanced, easy-to-use, mobile-friendly website to encourage Canadian families to reconnect with nature. People can become "citizen scientists" and report sightings of frogs and toads, flowering plants, receding lake ice and even earthworms. It's a call to the public for a nationwide effort to help track how environmental changes are affecting Canadian nature.

Started over 15 years ago, the Canada-wide NatureWatch program includes FrogWatch, PlantWatch, IceWatch and WormWatch — with plans for more programs to come. People are given information in these programs on how to use smartphones or computers to pin nature observations on an interactive map.

Spring call goes out to Canadians to record nature in their own backyards

Spring is here and with it NatureWatch and the Toronto Zoo are encouraging Canadians to get into their backyards and local parks and contribute to scientific research at the same time. NatureWatch.ca is launching an enhanced, easy-to-use, mobile-friendly website to encourage Canadian families to reconnect with nature. People can become "citizen scientists" and report sightings of frogs and toads, flowering plants, receding lake ice and even earthworms. It's a call to the public for a nationwide effort to help track how environmental changes are affecting Canadian nature.

Started over 15 years ago, the Canada-wide NatureWatch program includes FrogWatch, PlantWatch, IceWatch and WormWatch — with plans for more programs to come. People are given information in these programs on how to use smartphones or computers to pin nature observations on an interactive map.

Is radon on your radar? It should be

April 28, 2015

Report calls on governments to step up action to reduce cancer-causing gas in indoor air

VANCOUVER — Health Canada should tighten its radon guideline to better protect Canadians from this radioactive gas, says a David Suzuki Foundation report released today. Naturally occurring in soils, radon can seep into buildings, accumulate and reach high levels in indoor air. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies radon as a known human carcinogen, yet fewer than half of Canadians have heard of radon, and fewer still recognize it as a health hazard.

"Our national radon guideline is supposed to protect Canadians from this health hazard," said Lisa Gue, senior researcher and analyst with the David Suzuki Foundation. "Why then is Health Canada's guideline twice the level recommended by the World Health Organization?"

Report calls on governments to step up action to reduce cancer-causing gas in indoor air

VANCOUVER — Health Canada should tighten its radon guideline to better protect Canadians from this radioactive gas, says a David Suzuki Foundation report released today. Naturally occurring in soils, radon can seep into buildings, accumulate and reach high levels in indoor air. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies radon as a known human carcinogen, yet fewer than half of Canadians have heard of radon, and fewer still recognize it as a health hazard.

"Our national radon guideline is supposed to protect Canadians from this health hazard," said Lisa Gue, senior researcher and analyst with the David Suzuki Foundation. "Why then is Health Canada's guideline twice the level recommended by the World Health Organization?"

Nature is calling, Canada!

April 22, 2015