Photo: Monarch and milkweed FAQ

(Credit: Marcus Jeffrey via Flickr)

1. Where can I find general information about monarch butterflies?

2. Where can I find general information about milkweed and other pollinator-friendly plants?

3. Where can I get milkweed seeds?

Online vendors:

In 2017, the David Suzuki Foundation will be selling milkweed and wildflower seed packets. Check out the online store at store.davidsuzuki.org to find out more.

4. Where can I get milkweed plants?

The best way to get started is to call your local nurseries and garden centres and ask them if they carry milkweed native to your region. If they are out of stock or don't carry milkweed, ask them to stock milkweed plants and seeds native to your area next spring.

For a list of nurseries that carry a selection of native plants like milkweed, check out the North American Native Plant Society's comprehensive native plant growers list.

Below are nurseries and garden centres that have contacted us with indications that they plan to carry milkweed. To have your company's name added to the list, email contact@davidsuzuki.org with your company's name, website and location.

  • Native Plants Claremont, Pickering, ON http://www.nativeplants.ca/
  • St. Williams Nursery & Ecology Centre, * St. Williams, ON http://stwilliamsnursery.com/
  • Sheridan Nurseries, ON http://www.sheridannurseries.com/
  • Bloom Greenhouse, Bedford, NS http://www.bloomgreenhouse.com/
  • S.G. Native Plants, Forestville, ON Email sdmgu3@hotmail.com
  • West Coast Seeds, BC https://www.westcoastseeds.com

5. Where can I find information about planting pollinator gardens at schools?

6. Where can I get monarch-rearing kits?

7. Who can I contact for general gardening questions?

8. Where can I find out more about creating corridors for pollinators and monarch butterflies?

9. What is #knit4monarchs?

The #knit4monarchs campaign was launched on April 1, 2015 by the David Suzuki Foundation with the goal of encouraging Canadians to help beleaguered monarch butterflies by knitting D.I.Y. monarch chrysalises. These comfy creations provide shelter for young monarch caterpillars when they are at greatest risk of exposure and predation. The campaign aimed to capitalize on the recent popularity of knitting among young, hip urbanites and to engage long-established knitting communities. It was also inspired by the emergence of the field of "Craftivism," including urban yarn bombing interventions and campaigns to knit sweaters for penguins. Check out our #knit4monarchs video to learn more.

10. What is #gotmilkweed?

The David Suzuki Foundation launched its first #gotmilkweed campaign in April 2014. Through its website, thousands of milkweed plants were sold to Toronto residents and planted in parks and schools through the Homegrown National Park Project

In April 2015, the David Suzuki Foundation sold milkweed plants through the second annual #gotmilkweed campaign. Over the first two years, more than two thousand households across Toronto planted more than 10,000 milkweed plants in their yards, gardens, schoolyards and parks.

In April 2016, the Foundation launched the #gotmilkweed campaign for the first time in French, including plants for pick up in Montreal and Toronto and seed packets available for mail order in Canada. The sale resulted in more than a quarter million milkweed seeds being distributed across the monarch's range in Canada.

In 2017, the Foundation will be selling milkweed and wildflower seeds through it's new Butterflyway Project. In Quebec, milkweed seeds will be available through the Butterfly Effect.

Read more